FAQ

Person Impacted FAQ

The Restorative Justice Forum cannot proceed and the charges will be recommended to Crown Counsel in most cases.

No, it is voluntary for all parties.

If you do not consent to your file being referred to restorative justice, file will be referred back to the RCMP, crown court.

The timeline of each file differs depending on several factors, such as the number and availability of people participating, the severity of the offence and its impacts on people, the emotional state of each participant, and our caseload. As a general guideline, a typical file can vary from a few weeks to a few months.

As based on prior experience, resolutions have included apologies and financial restitution. As it is voluntary, other resolutions can be discussed between parties and agreed to. 

File is returned back to the RCMP, crown court.

Restorative Justice can occur before or after charges being officially laid.

No.  It is critical that the person affected engage with the person responsible as a part of the overall resolution process.

You would participate in a safe and guided forum conducted by a trained Restorative Justice Facilitator.  The person responsible would be at the forum and possible others such as law enforcement, probation, other victims, etc…

When a case is referred through the criminal justice system (police, Crown, judges, probation, etc.) and the offender does not complete the process, we send the file back to the referring agency and report to them what took place. The next steps depend on the referring agency.

Restorative justice is an opportunity for you to explore and state your needs, communicate with the offender in a way that works for you, access information from the offender, and ask for restitution and other actions from the offender with the goal of best addressing the harms you have experienced from the offence. We are here to support you along the way.

Research on restorative justice shows that victims who choose to participate often do so with the desire to gain or experience some or all of the following:

  • Information

  • Voice

  • Healing

  • Safety

  • Empowerment

  • Acknowledgement of wrongdoing

  • Financial compensation

Person Responsible FAQ

You can be criminally charged under the Criminal Code beginning at age 12.  Restorative Justice provides youth with an opportunity to avoid a youth criminal record.

The Restorative Justice Forum cannot proceed and the charges will be recommended to Crown Counsel in most cases.

No, restorative justice is not mandatory; a crucial aspect of our program is that participation must be voluntary for everyone.

If you choose to not complete the restorative justice process (either at the start or mid-way), we will return the file to the referring agency and they decide how to proceed.

The timeline of each file differs depending on several factors, such as the number and availability of people participating, the severity of the offence and its impacts on people, the emotional state of each participant, and our caseload. As a general guideline, a typical file can vary from a few weeks to a few months.

Restorative justice requires you to actively participate in the process by attending meetings, openly discussing the offence and what led up to it, exploring ways you can address harms that resulted from and causes of the offence, communicating (directly or indirectly) with people who were affected by your actions if they wish to participate, listening to their perspectives and sharing your own, and carrying out the agreement terms that are decided on.

As based on prior experience, resolutions have included apologies and financial restitution. As it is voluntary, other resolutions can be discussed between parties and agreed to. 

This rarely happens. But if a resolution is impossible, the Forum should be concluded and the referring agency notified of the unsuccessful outcome.

Each case is different and you should seek this information from the police, the prosecution, or your lawyer.

No. The restorative justice will work with you without the legal system.

In most cases, you will face criminal charges in court.

Restorative justice provides you with a unique opportunity to self-reflect, set goals, learn new perspectives, and give back to your community and the people you’ve affected in a supportive and safe environment. As a response to crime, it provides you a place to demonstrate accountability, address harms, transform shame or negative feelings you have about yourself and the crime, and access personal healing from harms you may have experienced that contributed to the offence. Some people who have participated in restorative justice have found the process to be life-changing. If you are willing to put in the time and energy, you may find that it has far-reaching positive effects in your life.